New Regulation Could Cause a Split in the Crypto Community

Big Crypto has arrived. On August 10, following days of wrangling and furious tweeting, cryptocurrency enthusiasts, advocates, and entrepreneurs watched in horror as the US Senate approved a $1 trillion infrastructure bill, complete with an article that many fear might jeopardize the whole American crypto sector beyond repair. The controversial rule would require that “brokers” of transactions in digital assets—i.e., cryptocurrencies—report their customers to the Internal Revenue Service so they can be taxed.

The crypto crowd griped that the bill’s definition of “broker” was so broad it would potentially encompass miners, validators, and developers of decentralized applications—all of which, while playing pivotal roles in the functioning of a blockchain ecosystem, have no way of identifying their anonymous users.

Initially, it had looked like the bill’s language might be tweaked to exempt those categories, as a trio of senators put forth an amendment clarifying the “broker” term. Then a White House-backed amendment appeared, pushing for a less lenient clarification, exempting proof-of-work miners—which use an energy-intensive process to secure blockchains such as Bitcoin or Ethereum—but not many other categories, such as proof-of-stake validators, which carry out the same function without the energy burning. Just as a compromise position was being worked out, the Senate decided to pass the bill unamended. Any change will have to happen at a later stage—and it likely will, given the patent unenforceability of the bill as is.

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On the face of it, it’s a drubbing for American crypto. But the narrative that has been doing the rounds is quite different: The infrastructure bill is a watershed moment in the history of cryptocurrency. The technology—at its core a crypto-anarchist, anti-bank, borderline anti-government manifesto disguised as code—has finally acquired that great marker of prestige: a lobby. The fact that some senators were ready to fight in crypto’s corner appears to show that the cryptocurrency industry is more than a gaggle of Twitter accounts and some blue-sky venture capitalists. Whatever the reason, it has influence, and—after the infrastructure bill saga—it will be ready to wield it even more deftly.

“We’re seeing the formalization, the maturing, of the crypto lobby, and this was the first coordinated effort that brought that to bear,” says Alex Brammer, vice president of business development at Luxor Tech, a bitcoin mining company. “Organizations like the Blockchain Association, the Texas Blockchain Council, or the Chamber of Digital Commerce are certainly going to continue their work.”

Cryptocurrency is usually, and lazily, described as a Wild West, but as a matter of fact the established businesses operating in the sector—from big mining enterprises to Wall Street–listed giants such as Coinbase—tend to crave regulation to define the boundaries of what is acceptable and what might get them into trouble. “Sophisticated players in this space welcome intelligent regulation. It provides clarity and predictability for large operations,” Brammer says. “It provides a set of rules of the road that allow large, publicly traded companies to make sure that they’re doing everything they can to be as viable and as profitable as possible going forward.”

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